Renaissance ? Perceptions of continuity and discontinuity in Europe, c.1300-c.1550

Lee Alxander, Péporté Pit, Schnitker Harry

Renaissance ? Perceptions of continuity and discontinuity in Europe, c.1300-c.1550

Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2010, XIII-370 p.

ISBN 978-90-04-18334-6

Résumé :

At least since the publication of Burckhardt’s seminal study, the Renaissance has commonly been understood in terms of discontinuities. Seen as a radical departure from the intellectual and cultural norms of the “Middle Ages”, it has often been associated with the revival of classical Antiquity and the transformation of the arts, and has been viewed primarily as an Italian phenomenon. In keeping with recent revisionist trends, however, the essays in this volume explore moment of profound intellectual, artistic, and geographical continuity which challenge preconceptions of the Renaissance. Examining themes such as Shakespearian tragedy, Michelangelo’s mythologies, Johannes Tinctoris’ view of music, the advent of printing, Burgundian book collections, and Bohemian “renovatio”, this volume casts a revealing new light on the Renaissance.

Alexander Lee, Ph. D. (2009) in History, University of Edinburgh, is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Luxembourg and the University of Warwick. His research concentrates on the interaction between classical philosophy and Christian theology in the thought of Francesco Petrarca.

Pit Péporté, Ph. D. (2008) in History, University of Edinburgh, is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Luxembourg. With a background in the medieval history of the Low Countries, he has also published in the fields of historiography and collective memory.

Harry Schnitker, Ph. D. (2008) in History, University of Edinburgh, is a research fellow in ecclesiastical history at the Maryvale Institute (Birmingham). His current research is concerned with the role of the veneration of saints in the creation of identities in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.


Axe de recherches :

  • Équipe 3 : Du local aux empires : appartenances, institutions, conflits

Vous aimerez aussi...